Tai Chi Blog

Tai Chi derives its name from the concept of "Yin" and "Yang" and as a centuries old martial art draws from many different fields and disciplines such as philosophy, martial arts, the strive for longevity, and finding “Oneness” — harmonizing body, mind and spirit not only within oneself but also with everything outside of our own physical being – to quote:

"Yin and Yang – The Mother of Ten Thousand Things."
Lao Tzu

This blog will over time try to feature a variety of aspects of this beautiful and captivating artform.

University of Berkeley | Wellness

Summary and excerpts from:
University of Berkeley | Wellness: Mind-Body Exercise

The ancient practices of Yoga and Tai Chi have become increasingly popular in the Western world, where you’ve probably heard them referred to as “mind-body” practices—a term loosely applied to activities or therapies that combine physical movement with a heightened awareness of the body in the present moment.

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Tai Chi “could be prescribed” for illnesses

Summary and excerpts from:
BBC News / Health
September 18, 2015

The ancient Chinese art improves physical performance and enhances quality of life, say researchers. Tai Chi combines deep breathing and relaxation with slow and gentle movements and boosts balance, posture and muscle power.

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How Meditation Changes the Brain and Body

Summary and excerpts from:
New York Times / Biological Psychiatry
By Gretchen Reynolds, February 18, 2016

Tai Chi is oftentimes referred to as "Meditation in Motion" through its highly sensitive awareness of the body not only within, through intent & mindfulness, but also to the outside through a feeling of a deep and fulfilling connectedness to everything that surrounds us. The resulting feeling of “Oneness with the universe” for many people opens the door to a profound feeling of harmony, calm and happiness. While the article below is not directly related to the practice of Tai Chi it nevertheless highlights one of them main benefits of this beautiful centuries-old martial art. ~andreas

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Tai Chi’s Synergy with Sports and Creative Arts such as Dance, Music, Painting and Writing

Summary and excerpts from:
The Harvard Medical School Guide to Tai Chi
"12 Weeks to A Healthy Body, Strong Heart, and Sharp Mind"
by Peter Wayne, PhD, with Mark L. Fuerst

At the most obvious, physical level, Tai Chi is an exercise that aims to strengthen, stretch, balance, coordinate and integrate the left and right halves of the body, the upper and lower halves of the body, and the extremities of the body with the inside or core. At a more subtle level, Tai Chi integrates body and mind. Body movements are coordinated with rhythmic, conscious breathing and multiple cognitive and emotional components – including focused attention, heightened self-awareness, visualization, imagery, and intention.

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Tai Chi as part of the Corporate Wellness Movement

Summary and excerpts from:
The Harvard Medical School Guide to Tai Chi
"12 Weeks to A Healthy Body, Strong Heart, and Sharp Mind"
by Peter Wayne, PhD, with Mark L. Fuerst

If you want to do better work, try Tai Chi, meditation, yoga, or other stress reduction techniques. That's what Mayo Clinic researchers suggested after examining the relationship between stress levels and quality of life at a work-site wellness center. The researchers conducted a survey of more than 13,000 employees joining a wellness center, asking them about stress, health behaviors, and quality of life.

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